Fruit Energy Jellies

I don’t know where to start so I’ll just start with telling you that I’m really excited about this.

I’ve been wanting a substitute for gel blocks for a long time. I don’t like the texture or taste. I usually just stick to squeezable energy gels. I don’t love those either, but it’s better than hitting the wall on a long run.

BGE is a picky eater, but for some reason, he’ll still eat any of the aforementioned products. I’m not going to be one of those crazy wives who tell their hubbies what they’re allowed to eat, but I did want him to have something a little more palatable.

I went through bag after bag of fruit. I was determined not to use agar-agar or gelatin. Sometimes I got a good result (the filling in the fruit tarts) and sometimes I would end up scraping burned strawberries into the garbage. Poor strawberries.

Anyways, when Cynthia from Two Red Bowls debuted her mochi recipe last week, I immediately whipped up a batch without even bothering to change out of my stinky running running clothes. I even skipped my ice bath. While the mochi were in the oven, it hit me. The thing I had been missing from my energy jellies had been sitting in my fridge all along. Sweet rice flour!

These came out perfect and they helped BGE power through the last day of Sufferfest. And yes, they have a lot of sugar, but they’re meant for an instant carb boost before or during and intense workout. A sugar rush for your endorphin rush.

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Fruit Energy Jellies

Ingredients

    for each batch
  • 14-16 oz frozen fruit (I used peach for one batch, and triple berry for the other)
  • 12 dates, pitted and chopped
  • 1 cup of sweet rice flour
  • 1/2 cup of sugar

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour and the sugar and aside.
  2. Defrost the fruit in a covered saucepan over medium heat, 8-10 min.
  3. Add the chopped dates and cook, covered, another 10 min.
  4. Remove from heat and puree.
  5. Immediately add the rice flour mixture. Mix well and get rid of any lumps.
  6. Preheat your oven to 275. Line a pan with parchment and dump your fruit mix into that. I was able to fit two batches in one 9 x 13 pan. (I didn't want the jellies to be tiny, like mochi) You should be able to spread the fruit in a a 9 x 6.5 rectangle.
  7. Cover the fruit with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Take it out and make some score marks across the top. This will help the jellies cook evenly. Otherwise, a firm skin will form across the top and it won't cook all the way through.
  8. Put the foil back on the pan, and the pan back in the oven.
  9. Cook for at least one more hour. It may need an hour and 10 min.
  10. Let it set completely (aka overnight) before you cut it. It helps to oil your knife beforehand. If you want to, you can use a pizza cutter.
http://kitchenwindowclovers.com/fruit-energy-jellies/

 

12 thoughts on “Fruit Energy Jellies

  1. Oh my god, THIS IS SO COOL!!!!! I am not a runner or endurance sports-er in any sense, so I would have never thought any of my recipes could be adapted for use in something like a gel block or fruit gel — omg. You’ve made my day. They sound and look tasty, too!! 😀 (Can I eat them for my TV marathons?)

  2. Yes! haha. I blue one for a BrBa marathon and then a dirigable plum (i wish) for a Harry Potter marathon. I want to thank you so so much for your mochi recipe. I was about to give up on home made energy jellies.

    1. They are quick to make, Shannon! As long as your kitchen timer is loud and annoying, you can pretty much pop them in the oven and then go about your other business. Like folding loads of clothes :/ my least favorite chore ever.

    1. Energy gels also make me gag. Especially in the winter when they get all cold and come out in one big lump. Yuck.

  3. So interesting! It never even occurred to me to try making my own fruit energy jellies…but wait, why were you determined not to use agar-agar? Is it bad for you?? I just bought some a few months ago and I thought it seemed harmless…

    1. I couldn’t find it a lot of places. So if I couldn’t find it easily, I didn’t want to send other people on a wild-goose chase either. Rice flour, on the other hand, is everywhere (and so cheap, too!)

    1. I get where you’re coming from! I love frozen fruit in smoothies, but sometimes I get smoothie-d out. Smothered by smoothie

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